Adobe Celebrates the Worst Stock Photos Ever

Adobe is promoting its stock photo service with a ‘limited edition clothing line’ celebrating such stock photo atrocities as ‘laughing woman eating healthy vegetable salad’ and ‘smiling seniors using laptop.’ The campaign pokes fun at famously bad images that services like Shutterstock are rife with, and commemorates the images by putting them on t-shirts and sweatshirts.

 

Fortunately, or unfortunately depending on your views on ironic t-shirts, none if it is actually for sale, but you can view the whole collection in a mock lookbook.

 

Some of the most generic stock photo concepts are well represented in the apparel line’s products:

Laughing Woman Eating Healthy Salad

Laughing Woman Eating Healthy Salad

International Business team Working Around Laptop

International Business team Working Around Laptop

Adobe approached advertising agency Abby Priest to create a campaign about Adobe Stock targeted at enterprise customers, highlighting the benefit of an uninterrupted workflow and generating awareness within the creative community.

The result: Adobe Stock Apparel, a limited edition clothing line giving a salute to the most infamous stock images creatives love to hate.

Man at Desk Frustrated with Technology

Man at Desk Frustrated with Technology

Smiling woman drawing red graph.

Smiling woman drawing red graph.

Happy senior couple piggybacking at the beach.

Happy senior couple piggybacking at the beach.

Smiling Seniors Using Laptop

Smiling Seniors Using Laptop

Firm handshake between business associates.

Firm handshake between business associates.

Mature business man with boxing gloves fighting co-worker.

Mature business man with boxing gloves fighting co-worker.

Happy office workers pointing to blank sign.

Happy office workers pointing to blank sign.

“Some stock images have earned their place in the history books,” says ad agency Abby Priest Creative Director Oskar Hellqvist.

Classic motifs that have been overused and established as hilarious clichés, known, loved and/ or hated by all. These images fulfil their purpose, surely. To me, however, they’re a representation of the old world of stock imagery.
It’s time for them to retire and leave room for new classics, premium content and a smarter, more efficient way of working,

Hellqvist continues:

Turning them into a limited edition clothing line is our way to salute them and an attempt to create something disruptive and unconventional in the genre.
Call-center woman wearing headset.

Call-center woman wearing headset.

The promotion rests on the premise that Adobe Stock weeds out the so-called low quality images found in other stock websites, saving creatives from spending time sifting through the cheesiest of photos.

 

It’s also worth noting this comes just after the news that Shutterstock is now offering a Photoshop plugin, making it possible for designers to access their extensive collections within Adobe’s own software.

 

Adobe tells us the clothing is available only for a select audience as part of a direct marketing campaign, and sadly, is not for sale to the public.